The Beguiled (2017 Film)

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Film Title

The Beguiled

Director

Sofia Coppola

Starring

  • Colin Farrell as Corporal John McBurney
  • Nicole Kidman as Miss Martha Farnsworth
  • Kirsten Dunst as Edwina Morrow
  • Elle Fanning as Alicia
  • Oona Laurence as Amy
  • Angourie Rice as Jane

Previously filmed in 1971, The Beguiled gets a reworking courtesy of Sofia Coppola and its different approach makes it one memorable movie of mounting tension and burgeoning sensuality.

It is 1864, Virginia and the Civil War is in motion. A young girl by the name of Amy from a nearby school for young girls, is out gathering mushrooms for food. She comes across Corporal John McBurney, a badly wounded Union Soldier and deserter. Helping him, Amy brings the unconscious man to her school. Here we meet the stalwart headmistress Miss Martha Farnsworth, vulnerable and melancholy teacher Edwina Morrow, and a few students, including teasing and bored teenager Alicia. There is curiosity among the girls about the man; many thinking it treason to harbor the enemy, but also a pang of sexuality as there hasn’t been a man around the isolated place for a long time. All of the ladies at the school in one way or another find themselves attracted to and curious about the handsome man in their residence. For the protective Martha, he is something that is tempting but troubling to her position of power. To shy Edwina, he is a decent man who seems to treat her with compassion. And to the precocious Alicia, he is something to project her kittenish desires on to. With the other younger girls, particularly Amy, John is something of a mysterious but friendly stranger. McBurney, while convalescing, does nothing to stop fanning the flames he has stoked and proceeds to flirt with the women. Largely, he manages to ingratiate himself into the hearts of the surrounding women, hoping to remain at the school and not return to the battlefield. Yet his trifling with their emotions in such a confined setting, will not be tolerated once fevered feelings finally get aired. The women themselves, particularly Martha, Edwina and Alicia, find themselves vying for his attentions and wrestling with romantic and lustful feelings. Soon events become complex for all the ladies, as the attraction and jealousies give way to irrevocable circumstances that tear the school to pieces in the wake of deception and anguish.

Sofia Coppola is at the helm of this steamy tale of repression and revenge, and goes about it with a finely tuned subtlety that is its chief asset. In comparison with the Don Siegel version that was more lurid and in your face(effectively so too), Coppola’s interpretation is more on the side of suggestion and nuance. Stifled desires and flurries of jealousy are glimpsed in actions and facial expressions, finding an unspoken way to project the inevitable chaos that will ring out soon enough. The tale, under the direction of Sofia Coppola, takes shape from a woman’s point of view, featuring the female gaze as opposed to the male one that so many films favour. John is repeatedly observed and lusted after in a variety of ways, most memorably when Martha sponge baths him and has to stop as her stifled desire is beginning to surface above her ladylike visage. A surprisingly sly wit also courses through the movie’s veins, which is unexpected but most welcome in the end. Themes of isolation and female identity have been explored through Coppola’s filmography already, but The Beguiled finds it in a darker setting. The choice by Coppola to have The Beguiled focus on the women primarily is a beneficial one, that allows expansion of character but also levels of surprising ambiguity. Plus, we aren’t told what to think about these people, rather it lets us make our minds up over their actions and consequences as they slowly become unsheathed. Who is really being beguiled in the film? Both John and the group of ladies exhibit signs of it, but the grey areas are what makes it so much more compelling to watch. Sofia Coppola has focused on isolation and female loneliness in her filmography successfully, here in The Beguiled, it lends itself excellently to this darker story that displays her command over suspense. While The Beguiled is definitely a psychological drama, a thriller element as the temperature rises, emerges under Coppola’s command. She shows she’s got a dab hand at creating tension; starting in the most subtle of ways before layering it with more prominent menace as John’s stay pulls apart the fabric of the female dominated house but comes around to find him in the process. Some of it can feel a tiny bit too gentle for such a tense story, but this is a minor quibble because the overall subtlety and open to interpretation approach lends The Beguiled an immensely watchable and tightly compact air. The evocative cinematography, based on shadowy bronze and occasional smattering of natural light, heightens the intensely claustrophobic cage that is the school, both for the women and John. A lot of it takes place within the aura of candlelight and closed curtains, further reinforcing the Southern Gothic entrapment of John and the tightly wound wheels of passion that are just fit to burst. There is an element of a very dark fairy tale present in the visuals, with the shafts of light through trees both coming off as beautiful and strange. And look out for the final shot of this movie, trust me it’s one that really speaks volumes and is strikingly executed. A sparse but effective score gathers momentum as darkness creeps into the tale.

Colin Farrell has the dashing good looks but also the talent to play the catalyst of The Beguiled. He is definitely someone who is manipulative and insincere in his promises, but an added depth comes out. Farrell brings with him a vulnerability that ultimately brings about his conniving behaviour, effectively he is brought down by his own plans. While Farrell is impressive in his part, the main focus of The Beguiled is the women. And they deliver brilliant work along the way. Nicole Kidman is both steely and motherly as the headmistress, who is not immune to feelings of passion that are stirred by John’s arrival. Through her watchful yet conflicted eyes, Kidman splendidly discovers a tough will and domineering hold over all who she sees; she is both protector and something of a jailer at the same time. For me, Kirsten Dunst, who has long been one of my favourite actresses, is the standout when starring as the wounded and easily lead Edwina. Her face presents a palpable sadness and a sincere hope of something that will take her away from the life she leads, a hope she thinks John will assist in. But Dunst also manages to inhabit something unpredictable in Edwina once betrayed, that rises with the jealousy of the characters around her. It’s an understated but very memorable performance. Elle Fanning, all pouting lips and come hither glances, nicely plays the teasing seductive student whose interest in John is far from wholesome. Young Oona Laurence makes a mark with a wide-eyed portrayal of children’s innocence, while Angourie Rice also stands out as one of the students growing attracted to the man in the school.

A decidedly Gothic and arresting drama of psychological desire and it’s consequences, The Beguiled finds Sofia Coppola stepping our of her comfort zone a little and fashioning something very haunting. Strikingly composed and executed, plus boasting some fine acting from a largely female cast, The Beguiled is very worthy of the praise it has been receiving.

Lost in Translation

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Film Title

Lost in Translation

Director

Sofia Coppola

Starring

  • Bill Murray as Bob Harris
  • Scarlett Johansson as Charlotte
  • Giovanni Ribisi as John

A bittersweet and moving drama, etched with comedy and pathos from Sofia Coppola, Lost in Translation makes for a beautifully crafted and thought-provoking movie of alienation and connection. Featuring two beautifully subtle and captivating performances from Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson, Lost in Translation is a movie to treasure for its quiet and engaging impact.

Bob Harris is a middle-aged, washed-up actor who has journeyed to Tokyo, Japan to shoot a whiskey commercial. Completely alienated as he doesn’t understand the language and blue because of his directionless existence( that includes estrangement from his wife and kids), Bob is lost in a sea of uncertainty and slowly drowning. Meanwhile, a young woman named Charlotte, fresh out of Yale and newly married, is also in Tokyo and the same hotel. She too feels ignored and questioning of herself, as her inattentive photographer husband John seems to care more about his career than her. Charlotte is left to her own devices, yet can’t shake the instability and indecision of her life. Both jet lagged and struggling with insomnia, Bob and Charlotte meet one night in the hotel bar. Despite them being different in more ways than one, they begin to forge a friendship that opens their eyes to something more positive and worthwhile. Through their encounters, both of the humorous and heartfelt variety, and the deep bond that they form, Bob and Charlotte are able to face the challenges of life and consider that it actually be something wonderful if they look closer.

Sofia Coppola strikingly yet subtly directs and writes this wonderful movie, capturing an honesty and heartfelt story of two unlikely soul mates finding solace in each other’s company. Her rendering of their existences as troubled and searching is nicely complimented by a good dose of humour. It straddles the line between comedy and drama, without sacrificing any of the poignant or bittersweet angles of the tale. Coppola displays a quiet confidence and her measured approach with both her directing and script is notably transfixing. Loneliness and a feeling of not belonging are heightened by the culture shock of the Japanese setting and the visuals of large buildings that dwarf Bob and Charlotte. And talking of visuals, they are simply sublime and have real substance in framing the central duo as isolated and fish out of water. The lighting scheme, gold hues and often a certain blue, highlights both the melancholia of their situations and the often nighttime confessions that each shares along the way of their bond. A certain shimmer is found in the cinematography too, hinting at their may be a chance of hope for both the listless souls in Lost in Translation. And the way that Japan is used is gorgeous, utilizing the beauty and scope of the country to its advantage. Crucially and one of the instruments that really made me appreciate Lost in Translation, was that although an emotional feeling is generated between Bob and Charlotte, it doesn’t lead to a love affair. So many Hollywood films go for the obvious and expected when you have a film about two people unintentionally connecting, thankfully Lost in Translation doesn’t fall into that trap. An atmospheric and ambient soundtrack is the ideal companion to the film, soaking it in a layer of hope, escape and pathos.

The acting in Lost in Translation is a definite high point of an already impressive movie. Bill Murray turns in a restrained yet subtly expressive portrayal of tired loneliness and the want to experience something. Moving from deadpan comedy to sensitive depth, Murray is at some of his best as the sympathetic Bob, searching for something hopeful to come along. All it takes is just the slightest movement of his eyes and face, and you know all there is to know about the character, down to the fact that Murray plays him so stunningly. Equally as good is Scarlett Johansson, who despite only being 17 at the time of filming, contributed a mature and exquisitely subtle performance. Finding nuance, humour and melancholy in Charlotte, Johansson holds her own and is mesmerising to watch. What makes their portrayals so beautiful is the little moments of quietly suggesting thoughts and dreams, achieved with the most simple yet meaningful ways. The two boast a believable rapport with each other, discovering a platonic yet still caring need for the companionship to combat the alienation of their respective lives. Giovanni Ribisi, who previously narrated The Virgin Suicides, appears as Charlotte’s busy husband, whose hipster attitude and blatant lack of concern have you seeing why she wants to find something close to connection.

Evocative, soulful and charming, Lost in Translation is a triumph for both Sofia Coppola and main actors, Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Together, they create a touching film about unexpectedly finding someone to relate too and escaping from the pressures of life while facing up to some of them.

What Do You Think of Sofia Coppola?

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My answer to the question I pose is that I find her to be an extremely gifted and beautiful director. The way she creates a mood and feeling through visuals and music is gorgeous. Her movies tap into real emotions of alienation and loneliness, while still having something of a quirky humour. You’ve heard what I think, now I want to know what you make of Sofia Coppola?

Please Check Your Spam

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I thought that the comment issue if the other week had passed me by, but it looks like things are playing up again. I hate to inconvenience anyone, but could you please check that my comments aren’t in your spam. I really don’t like when this happens, but I’m remaining positive that it’s only a temporary issue. Thanks for all listening and taking the time to find my disappearing comments.

The Fabulous Baker Boys

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Film Title

The Fabulous Baker Boys

Director

Steve Kloves

Starring

  • Michelle Pfeiffer as Susie Diamond
  • Jeff Bridges as Jack Baker
  • Beau Bridges as Frank Baker

An enchanting comedy-drama of music, family and dreams, The Fabulous Baker Boys provides laughs and pathos with a fine trio of central performances by Jeff and Beau Bridges, and especially the lovely Michelle Pfeiffer.

Jack and Frank Baker are the eponymous, travelling musical duo; piano playing brothers who perform regularly and are opposites in almost every way. While older brother Frank is the responsible sibling who is always organised, Jack is a sometimes sullen man who has grown tired of their long running act despite being the more talented one. With business slipping and them having to perform in less than glamorous lounges as a second-rate act, both are feeling the strain of what their careers have become. Frank enjoys his music and does it to support his family, while Jacks feels the emptiness of it all. They have the idea to audition a female singer, to breathe some life into their act and hopefully drum up some business. The first few ladies they get are all pretty bad and it looks like the guys will just have to continue their act just the way it is. That is until former escort Susie Diamond walks in to audition, even though she’s an hour age a half late. Gorgeous, witty and with a take no bull honesty, she wins Jack and Frank over when she starts to sing. Now feeling a bit more rejuvenated, the group begins experiencing success with Susie as the star attraction. But with the success comes doubt and frustration, as Frank becomes concerned that Jack is romantically pursuing Susie. He worries that this will jeopardize all of them if everything gets too personal, and sure enough it does. This throws a spanner in the works and as both of them having to deal with dormant feelings of being failures and still trying to go on. While on the road touring, the dynamics of the brothers change as both, along with Susie, have to contend with disillusionment and the wanting for something more in their lives.

Steve Kloves both writes and directs this beguiling and elegant piece of film. And considering it was the first movie he directed, his inexperience doesn’t show. In fact, the easy confidence and attention to character are spectacularly done, displaying his gift for letting his actors do their thing and not being overly flashy with overt style. Kloves sprinkles an Old Hollywood feeling to the work, that’s mixed with a contemporary sensibility and nuanced depth. Comedic moments abound, with the crackling screenplay firing zingers throughout, while balancing the character’s shaky relationships and desires. Laughs and sadness seem to go hand in hand in The Fabulous Baker Boys, making it a whole experience. The occasional meandering moment can be ignored because of how well-defined and invested the characters are, plus the fact that we do like watching their wishes and dashed dreams unfold. As music is a big part of it, The Fabulous Baker Boys doesn’t disappoint on that score.  And what beautiful music it is! Silky smooth jazz grooves and slinky torch songs, lend both a sexiness and melancholy to the overall picture. And speaking of sexiness, I can’t review The Fabulous Baker Boys and not mention it’s most famous scene. In it, Susie, clad in a figure hugging, red dress, lounges across the piano and sings ‘Makin Whoopee’. Backed by the impressively warm and sultry cinematography that hovers over everything, it’s a sizzling high point of a fantastic movie.

While it is The Fabulous Baker Boys who have the title, the film really is a show for the talents of Michelle Pfeiffer. As the effervescent Susie, she displays a whole multitude of sides and angles that are natural and convincing( plus showcasing some gorgeous vocals). She’s tough yet vulnerable, hardened but dreamy and both nervous and seductive. Pfeiffer completely owns the role with a deft assurance. It’s a plum role for any actress, but Pfeiffer makes it so you can’t imagine anyone else playing it except her. For my money, this is one of the finest hour’s from one of my favourite actresses. Ably complimenting Pfeiffer’s excellence are the eponymous duo, envisioned by real life siblings Jeff and Beau Bridges. The chalk and cheese nature of the characters is nicely observed through the work of them both; Jeff’s charm and quietly seething demeanor as Jack counteracted by the more savvy but fussy personality displayed by Beau as Frank . I really got into their bond that they shared, which while shaky and volatile, still had a depth of heart ever-present. Being real life brothers obviously lends itself excellently to the often volatile relationship of the duo. The chemistry is natural and when the deeper feelings emerge, it’s intriguing to ponder whether it is just acting or something much more personal. Whatever the view, the Bridges Brothers bounce off one another effortlessly, while highlighting a certain weariness and quiet rivalry.

A slice of life drama and comedy, that has sparkling dialogue and an undercurrent of wistfulness, The Fabulous Baker Boys is sublime entertainment, well performed and nicely crafted.

The Sentinel

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Film Title

The Sentinel

Director

Michael Winner

Starring

  • Cristina Raines as Alison Parker
  • Chris Sarandon as Michael Lerman
  • John Carradine as Father Halliran
  • Burgess Meredith as Charles Chazen
  • Ava Gardner as Miss Logan
  • Deborah Raffin as Jennifer
  • Arthur Kennedy as Monsignor
  • Eli Wallach as Detective Gatz
  • Christopher Walken as Detective Rizzo
  • Martin Balsam as Professor Ruzinsky
  • José Ferrer as Robed Figure
  • Sylvia Miles as Gerde
  • Beverly D’Angelo as Sandra
  • Jeff Goldblum as Fashion Photographer
  • Jerry Orbach as Director

A 70’s horror with an all-star cast, I was expecting The Sentinel to be a treat. Alas, it was a shoddy mess that descended into ludicrous and incomprehensible places. There are nary any positives in this film, which could have been something special, fur floundered into the abyss of rubbish.

Alison is a young, pretty model living in New York. Though in a relationship with slick lawyer Michael Lerman, she is reluctant to move in with him or consider engagement. She decides to find her own place to live. While seemingly living the high life, Alison has baggage in her memories that still haunt her and refuse to let go. Continuing looking for a place, she is recommended by realtor Miss Logan, a beautiful Brooklyn Heights apartment. She notices a man in the top apartment window. Miss Logan informs her that it is Father Halliran, a blind priest who seems to sit there without ever really moving. Thrilled at the scope of the place and the reasonable amount being asked for, Alison moves in. Shortly after arrival, Alison encounters some of the strange tenants of the building, starting with the peculiar and intrusive Charles Chazen. Gradually, Alison’s nights are disturbed by horrific visions of her troubled past that involved an attempted suicide and is plagued by unnerving noises from another apartment. Frightened yet very curious, Alison is then shocked to learn that only she and Father Halliran reside in the complex, with no one having previously occupied it for three years. Becoming more alarmed by events that may or may not be real, Alison crumbles completely. Somehow, she is linked to a centuries old pattern that the apartment block has which poses a deadly and potentially otherworldly trouble. Can Alison really figure out why these visions appear and what sinister designs are being made for her?

Michael Winner gets some atmosphere going at the start, but his lack of taste and frankly trying direction makes The Sentinel really drag and go into a place of boredom. He plays up the overt sensationalism and outrageous moments to an extent that they aren’t frightening or remotely chilling. The visual style is one positive point( even though it’s sadly only one such instance) finding a certain gloss and at least setting some spooky aura. This however is drowned out by the sheer implausibility and inanity  of it all, that causes The Sentinel to be a major let down. The Sentinel film that could have been something if thought had actually gone into. What we are left with is a confused and histrionic film, that doesn’t generate hardly any terror or resonance. There is one scene that is rightly celebrated for its scare factor, but apart from that, The Sentinel is laughable and deplorable. I mean, I’m game for some campy and melodramatic moments in horror, often they can be quite fun. But the overload, coupled with a dragging, not to mention hard to follow story, was too much for me to take. And there is one thing in The Sentinel that really left a bad taste in my mouth. When all hell breaks loose and the supposed fright of the movie is in swing, one manifestation of evil is depicted as people with prominent deformities. The main thing I took issue with was that the people used were actually deformed themselves. When you put a physical defect or disability on screen, it should be done with respect. Here, it equates the deformities with evil, which really didn’t lie well with me. It felt exploitative and mean-spirited, especially as the implication it made was in very poor taste. The music score is passable with some unusual passages, yet like the rest of The Sentinel, over cooks events to a laughable degree.

As aforementioned, The Sentinel has an unbelievable cast. The sad news is, hardly any of them are given anything to work with and show off their skills. Cristina Raines, in the lead of tormented model, is basically required to look frightened and pretty. She does both things well enough, but there’s nothing really meaty for her else to do. Chris Sarandon at least tries his best with putting some cocky attitude into the role of the lawyer boyfriend. John Carradine, heavily made up to look older, is pretty effective as the largely silent priest whose eerie presence hangs over the building. Burgess Meredith rocks creepy to the hilt as a pesky and very unusual neighbour, who becomes more than just a common nuisance. Ava Gardner is completely wasted as the realtor of the place, only appearing a handful of times and not equipped with much in the way of action to play. Deborah Raffin is pretty bland as Alison’s best friend, while experienced veteran actor Arthur Kennedy at least contributes some mystery as an enigmatic priest. Eli Wallach and a young Christopher Walken are seen in a thread of the story that makes no sense and wastes the obvious talents of two reliable stars. Martin Balsam and José Ferrer, two fine actors, both appear in blink and you’ll miss it roles which is extremely unfortunate. Sylvia Miles and Beverly D’Angelo certainly have the strangeness down in their parts, but not much else because the script restricts them. Bit parts are also handed to Jeff Goldblum and Jerry Orbach. The mix of old and new stars was supposed to be amazing, but they are never given any time to shine or strut their stuff.

A big mess of a movie that showed potential but quickly became farce, The Sentinel is one to avoid in the horror genre.

What Horror Movies Would You Recommend to Me?

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Horror is probably my favourite movie genre. I think it all start when my Grandpa let me watch The Fog at the age of 12 and being both frightened and thrilled. Since then horror has been a go to genre for me, as I love the variety you can have. While I would say I’m a horror hound, there are still a huge number of horror flicks I haven’t seen yet. So this is where I ask all of fabulous people to intervene. Which horror movies would you highly recommend to me? As I know you are all amazing, I just know you’ll come with some great scary movies for me to see. And below is my pretty lame attempt at creating a classic horror movie scream.

Burnt Offerings

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Film Title

Burnt Offerings

Director

Dan Curtis

Starring

  • Oliver Reed as Ben Rolf
  • Karen Black as Marian Rolf
  • Bette Davis as Aunt Elizabeth
  • Lee H. Montgomery as Davey Rolf
  • Burgess Meredith as Arnold Allardyce
  • Eileen Heckart as Roz Allardyce

A haunted house horror/mystery that uses suggestion and enigmas to raise tension and atmosphere, Burnt Offerings is a seriously underrated chiller. Unease and the raising of hairs on the back of the neck are guaranteed in this effective movie.

The Rolf family; husband and wife Ben and Marian, their 12-year-old son Davey and elderly but sprightly Aunt Elizabeth, decide to take a summer vacation. They find a large house that is asking for tenants in California’s countryside. The house is marvellous, big in size and area, but a little dilapidated. Still, the reasonably cheap price to stay for the summer is very tempting. After meeting the slightly unusual brother and sister Arnold and Roz Allardyce, who own the house,  Marian becomes insistent on staying there. Ben is not so sure, especially as they ask them to take care of their elderly mother. She never comes out of her living quarters, so they are just required to bring meals to her door. Ben eventually agrees after seeing how much Marian would love it. Upon arrival, have left for some vague reason. Making the place their own for the time that they have, the family settle in nicely . But the house soon reveals that it’s not the most hospitable place for guests and seems to have something evil inside it. Marian is the main person who is influenced in a malevolent manner by the old house, becoming obsessed with it, rejuvenating the old place and behaving alarmingly alienated towards her family. Other strange events unfold like a seemingly possessed Ben nearly drowning Davey in the pool, the greenhouse of dead flowers slowly coming back to life and Marian’s insistence that the house needs her. Everything seems to link to the very house itself, which appears to wield a strange power over all that enter. But just what can it want with the family and in particular Will any of the family truly discover the sinister secrets and shocks of the house? Or will the house itself get them before it is too late?

The creeping thrills and strange mystery are kept to a good level of skill by director Dan Curtis. The set up boats all the usual hallmarks of a haunted house movie, bit the mysterious approach and the fact that we aren’t hit over the head with overt explanations, makes Burnt Offerings a good and under appreciated entry into the genre. Just how and why the house is tormenting them is the main mysterious crux of Burnt Offerings. It is only gradually that the real intentions of the house come into the light. The photography is one if the highlights of Burnt Offerings; enveloping events in a dream like haze that starts out quite nicely and joyfully, then little by little gets to an ominous level of chilling intensity. I also liked how it was different from some haunting movies. In a lot of them,  the haunting is designed to scare the people out, the malevolence actually wants to trap them for its own insidious purpose. To spoil the intention and designs of the house would be a major disservice to the creepy tone and uncomfortable events of Burnt Offerings. I will say that it is something very alarming and disturbing, yet done with degrees of exceptional subtlety and bubbling menace that make it pretty satisfying. The house is pretty much a character itself, though one that you really are t sure of. You know it’s evil because we’re in a horror movie, but the ways that it influences all, particularly Marian, is still pretty unsettling and spooky stuff. The slow burning pace is largely excellent in developing the evil of the house and building up numerous enigmatic angles. One little problem I had was that Burnt Offerings gets a bit leisurely in the middle half of the picture, when it should have some oomph in its engine. Saying that, it is redeemed quickly by what follows and the sensational climax of what is a really compelling horror mystery. Up and down strings and the old classic music box sound are in abundance, making Burnt Offerings suspenseful even when nothing unusual is happening. It’s that hint that something sinister will transpire that the score really works on.

Oliver Reed is his usual intense self as the husband under siege from the house, his dramatic approach lending itself well to the character’s eventual descent into tormented horror. Karen Black makes for a marvellously and genuinely creepy leading lady. Playing Marian, who becomes almost immediately entranced with the house, her unusual tics and mannerisms slowly emerge into something very alarming. It’s a credit to Black’s talent that you buy into how unusually obsessed and spine chilling Marian becomes, as her once genial persona starts to get more peculiar, mercurial and generally unstable as time passes. The great Bette Davis brings her professionalism and grand standing to the part of energetic Aunt Elizabeth, who is really the first to suspect something amiss in the house. It’s a supporting role, but when you have Davis, even in smaller roles she displays her immense talent and steals the scenes she is in. Lee H. Montgomery does the frightened child act well, while the brief but very memorable appearances of Burgess Meredith and Eileen Heckart as the unusual siblings who own the house, makes a deep impression and spooky one at that.

Spooky entertainment and creepy thrills abound in this slow-burning but extremely eerie horror film. If you like some haunted house horror, with mysterious overtones and good cast, Burnt Offerings is probably the flick for you.

Comment Issue Solved

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It would appear that the comment issue that plagued me recently has rectified itself. I am very happy about this and feeling fantastic. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that it will be sometime before the issue comes about again. Thanks for all keeping an eye out for any of my stray comments, it means a lot. Now I’m back, here’s my reaction to it:

What Is Your Favourite Drew Barrymore Performance?

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Many of you may have realised that I’ve been watching quite a few films starring the lovely Drew Barrymore. Although there are some who largely just consider her a romantic comedy queen, from going through her credits I’ve noticed how versatile and adventurous she has been as an actress. And while I’ve always been a fan, I’ve gained a new-found appreciation for her talent as of late from sifting through her varied filmography. She is for my money, quite an underrated actress in my eyes. So the question is, which role of hers is your favourite?